Author Archives: skelution

Self-Defence & Other Hobbies

The Park Gallery, Callendar House, Falkirk.
30th November 2013 – 25th January 2014.

‘Self-Defence & Other Hobbies’ features a range of techniques and materials that reference some of the more lugubrious sides to leisure and entertainment today.

All artworks made in 2013 for The Park Gallery, Callendar House.

Seinfeld
The Stand-In (season 5, episode 16)
Written by Larry David, 1994.

GEORGE: It’s just not good, it’s not good.
JERRY: It’s not good.
GEORGE: I’m bored. She’s boring, I’m boring, we’re both boring. We got out to eat, we both read newspapers.
JERRY: Well at breakfast everybody reads.
GEORGE: No. Lunch we read, dinner we read.
JERRY: You read during lunch?
GEORGE: Ya
JERRY: Oh, well.
GEORGE: There’s nothing to talk about.
JERRY: Ya, what’s there to talk about.
GEORGE: Well at least you and I are talking about how there’s nothing to talk about.
JERRY: Why don’t you talk to her about how there’s nothing to talk about?
GEORGE: She knows there is nothing to talk about.
JERRY: At least you’ll be talking.
GEORGE: Oh shut up.

New Ruins

A residency and exhibition at Walled Garden, Glasgow.
July 2013.

Four sand sculptures depict a classical-style ruin site within Glasgow’s Walled Garden. These temporary sculptures were installed on the footprint of an old bathroom within the site of the former cleansing depot in Glasgow city centre.

On a vacant ‘Stalled Space’ in Cowcaddens, Glasgow, beside the Forth & Clyde canal The Bothy Project set up a sculpture garden, bothy studio and events space. Throughout the summer of 2013 this Walled Garden hosted a series of artist residencies and events: www.thebothyproject.org.

Glasgow City Council created the ‘Stalled Spaces’ programme to “encourage temporary use of vacant land, under utilised open space and sites earmarked for development though stalled.”

Future Spotters (Kassel, 1987 & Münster, 2013)

A solo exhibition at Wewerka Pavilion, Münster, Germany,
June – August 2013.

Including:
3 x chairs (sand, water and spray paint);
3 x chairs (biodegradable materials);
1 x table (biodegradable materials);
3 x clothed figures with small scale local sculptures as heads, feet and hands (mixed media);
3 x outdoor podiums (sand and water).


12. October, 2012.

Dear Georg,

Thank-you for showing me around Münster and Dusseldorf. I’m so pleased to have made it back to Münster. My previous visits to the city had been during the Sculpture Project but it was so good to see the city in more normal circumstances.
Thank-you too for the information about Stefan Wewerka’s pavilion. I didn’t know that it was first constructed in Kassel for Documenta 8 back in 1987. Knowing this I cannot help ‘unpicking’ the building – working out how it could’ve been packed and reassembled in its current location.
I have to confess that I didn’t know much about Stefan Wewerka’s buildings, sculptures or furniture until I started investigating it. I’m now a fan. I like his mix of wit and elegance.
I’ve been given some photographs of the pavilion from when it was in Kassel. Some of these photos are of the first exhibition for Documenta 8. The photos came from Axel Bruchhäuser from the company Tecta in Lauenförde, where they have an earlier version of this pavilion.
As far as I can gather the first exhibition held in the Münster pavilion was a collection of Stefan Wewerka’s eccentric chairs. For my exhibition at the Wewerka pavilion this summer I think I will try to recreate this first exhibition in Kassel. I have some figuring out to do as there are gaps in the documentation that I have been given.

I look forward to seeing you again in the summer.
Warm regards

Alex

N.B. A German translation of this letter was displayed within the exhibition.

Reference Material

 

The Connoisseurs, DCA

A solo exhibition at Dundee Contemporary Arts,
13th March – 23rd May 2010.

The Connoisseur might be defined as a laconic art historian, and the art historian as a loquacious connoisseur. Erwin Panofsky, Meaning in the Visual Arts, 1955.

The Connoisseurs is an exhibition defined by the seemingly disparate series’, collections and groupings within it. All of these works reference cultural sophistication or a refined taste through their materials, execution or selection. In a mannered fashion they borrow an aspect of the classical art form: portrait or still-life image, the outdoor or the domestic scale object.
The Connoisseurs presents an awkward marriage of numerous distinct references: digital technology, food science, community craft workshops, speculative fiction and macro-economics. The title alludes to both the professional and amateur status of a connoisseur.

Blind Drawings

“In Alex Frost’s drawings photographs are transcribed as a system of marks plotting areas of light and shadow recorded in the pixels of the image. A pattern of zeroes, dashes and crosses laid out on squared paper describe a cluster of flowers in bloom, a profile or the unique arrangement of features and details of clothing that forms a portrait. A series of self-portraits (Blind drawings 2006-7) are stippled by puncturing the paper with pinholes. Bronze, silver and gold paint is pressed into the back of the drawing so that the holes admit rich, metallic colour and Frost’s image appears to float to the surface of the paper. Eyes closed and head slightly turned or tilted away he seems intent on absence, a blank subject present as a gilded apparition, a relief, a death mask.”
From the essay ‘Nullius in Verba – The work of Alex Frost’, Michelle Cotton, 2008.